HEPATITIS B & C

 

 

Hepatitis Animation Video

 

 

QUICK SITE NAVIGATION

 

 

 

 

HOME

HOMEOPATHY

ABOUT DOCTOR

DISEASES

Spinal Disorder

Diabetes

Hepatitis C&B

Male Gentile

Female Gentile

Kidney's Problem

Stomach Disorders

Hemorrhoid / Anal Fissure

 CONSULTANCY

MEDIA GALLERY

NEW UPDATE

TESTIMONIAL

URDU SECTION

SITE MAP

CONTACT US

 

 

 

 

 

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The virus, which is called hepatitis B virus (HBV), can cause lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death.

Signs and symptoms of hepatitis B

Many people who become infected with HBV experience mild symptoms or no symptoms at all, but they may still carry the infectious virus and pass it on to others. When symptoms do appear they are similar to those of hepatitis A and may include:

bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat

A short, mild, flu-like illness.

Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Loss of appetite.

Weight loss.

Jaundice (yellow skin and whites of eyes, darker yellow urine and pale faces).

Itchy skin.

How hepatitis B is spread

The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is very common worldwide, with more than 350 million people infected. Those with long term HBV are at high risk of developing liver cirrhosis or liver cancer.

Hepatitis B is most frequently passed on through the exchange of bodily fluids with an infected person. HBV is estimated to be 50 to 100 times more infectious than HIV.1

HBV can be spread in the following ways:

bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat

By unprotected (without a condom) penetrative sex (when the penis enters the anus, vagina or mouth) with someone who is infectious. Also by sex that draws blood with someone who is infected.

By sharing contaminated needles or other drug-injecting equipment.

By using non-sterilised equipment for tattooing, acupuncture or body piercing.

From an infected mother to her baby, most commonly during delivery. Immunisation of the baby at birth prevents the transmission of hepatitis b.

Through a blood transfusion in a country where blood is not screened for blood-borne viruses such as hbv.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is found in the blood of persons who have the disease. HCV is spread by contact with the blood of an infected person.

Hepatitis C, like other forms of hepatitis, causes inflammation of the liver. The hepatitis C virus is transferred primarily through blood, and is more persistent than hepatitis A or B. Worldwide, estimates suggest 170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C, with 3 to 4 million people newly infected each year.

Signs and symptoms of hepatitis C

Many people do not experience any symptoms when they become infected with hepatitis C. Symptoms may emerge later, taking anywhere between 15 and 150 days to develop. Occasionally a person will not develop any symptoms and their immune system will successfully clear the virus without their knowledge. An infected person without symptoms can still act as a carrier and pass the virus on to others.

Symptoms may include:

bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat

A short, mild, flu-like illness.

Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Loss of appetite.

Weight loss.

Jaundice (yellow skin and whites of eyes, darker yellow urine and pale faces).

Itchy skin.

How hepatitis C is spread

High-risk groups are the same in many societies and cultures. They include injecting drug users, people who receive transfusions of unscreened blood, haemophiliacs, dialysis patients and people who have unprotected sex with multiple sex partners.

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be spread in the following ways:

bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat
bullat

By sharing drug-injecting equipment (needles, heating spoons, etc). This is the primary transmission route for hcv and hiv outside sub-saharan Africa.

By using non-sterilised equipment for tattooing, acupuncture or body piercing. This can be a problem in countries where tattooing or scarification is a traditional ritual practice.

Through exposure to blood during unprotected sex with an infected person. Blood may be present because of genital sores, cuts or menstruation. Sexual transmission is an uncommon way of becoming infected with hepatitis c.

Rarely, from an infected mother to her baby during childbirth. The risk may be greater if the mother is also infected with hiv.

Through blood transfusion. In many developing countries blood is not screened (tested) for the hepatitis c virus. All blood for transfusion in the uk and usa is tested.

By sharing equipment used to snort cocaine. Usually this is a rolled banknote, which can become contaminated with blood from a person’s nose.

Related Pages

Hepatitis C&B

Hepatitis C&B

SITE NAVIGATION

Main Pages

Home

About Doctor

Media Gallery

New Update

Testimonial

Urdu Section

 

 

Site Map

Contact Us

Homeopathy & Consultancy

About Homeopathy

Homeopathy and Science

Research In Homeopathy

FAQs About Homeopathy

 

 

Online Consultancy

Fee Structure

Payments Method

City Tour Schedule

Diseases

All Diseases List

Spinal Disorder

Diabetes

Hepatitis C&B

Male Gentile

Female Gentile

Kidney's Problem

Stomach Disorders

Hemorrhoid / Anal Fissure

Hepatitis C&B

Hepatitis C&B

 

 

 

Design and Powered by
Www.BlueApplesystems.Com

 

Copy Right
Dr. Ghulam Mustafa